Italian Road – Classic Italian Cycles http://classicitaliancycles.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:23:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://classicitaliancycles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-141x136.png Italian Road – Classic Italian Cycles http://classicitaliancycles.com/ 32 32 Footballers who cycle XI – World Cup stars who love life on two wheels https://classicitaliancycles.com/footballers-who-cycle-xi-world-cup-stars-who-love-life-on-two-wheels/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:08:40 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/footballers-who-cycle-xi-world-cup-stars-who-love-life-on-two-wheels/ It may be gray, cold and rainy here in the UK, but the World Cup is underway, which gives us the perfect excuse to pull out the tactical board and bring you a list of football stars (and stars). ‘others less worthy of the title) past and present that would make our ‘footballers who cycle […]]]>

It may be gray, cold and rainy here in the UK, but the World Cup is underway, which gives us the perfect excuse to pull out the tactical board and bring you a list of football stars (and stars). ‘others less worthy of the title) past and present that would make our ‘footballers who cycle XI’.

From the big names in England’s major tournament teams to winners of the Premier League, Champions League and World Cup, these are the thirteen names we would send to bring the trophy home (by bike)…


Goalkeeper – Ben Foster


Ben Foster Partnership Garmin.JPG

I mean, was it going to be anyone other than “Cycling GK”?

With eight caps for England and nearly 500 appearances over two decades with Manchester United, Watford, Birmingham City and West Bromwich Albion, Foster ticks the ‘pair of safe hands’ box.

> “If a professional cyclist could walk into a football club and show the players how hard they work, it would really open their eyes,” says Ben Foster

More importantly, with over 1.2 million subscribers to his YouTube channel ‘The Cycling GK’ where he regularly documents his Zwift exploits and life on a pretty tasty Specialized S-Works Diverge, Foster has clearly caught the cycling bug. cycling.

Oh, and in March of last year, he joined us for Drink at your Desk Live to tell us about it…

Right-back – Lee Dixon

Sharing a snapshot of this beauty was always going to please us…

Centre-back — Virgil van Dijk

Virgil van Bike gets the go-ahead to lead the baseline. Strong, dominant in the air, with the characteristic Dutch skill to play from the back. You would probably also give him the captain’s armband. In another life, we imagine Virgil guiding his GC leader to the front of the pack, taking no mischief and never missing the front rung.

Centre-back – Joe Williams

Suggestions for a second centre-back would be welcome. No two ways about it, we were in trouble here…

Unless you’re a regular at Ashton Gate, you’re probably shouting “who?” to us – no offense, Joe – but the Bristol City scouser’s enthusiasm for saddle-height adjustments, only to almost crash into a team-mate and blame his “deathtrap” machine was oddly relatable.

Is he a central defender? No. Do we ask him to play there? Absolutely.

Left-back – Moritz Volz

Here is the gift written by a Fulham fan…

Like Gareth Southgate, we attract as many right-backs as possible into this defence, but Volz – the scorer of the Premier League’s 15,000th goal, prompting headlines of ‘15,000 Volz’ in the back pages – is probably the one of the most deserving newcomers to our team. .

While in south-west London, the German regularly trained and played at Craven Cottage on his folding bike, with Jimmy Bullard calling his team-mate a “real crackpot” in an interview with the Guardian.

“He used to go to bike practice and sometimes to games, which is saying a lot,” Bullard said. Nothing weird about that, Jimmy…

Right Midfield – Mo Salah

As the song says: ‘Mo Salah, Mo Salah, Mo Salah, pedaling on the fender…’ or something like that…

The Egyptian King earns a spot in our XI thanks to this lockdown tweet which, painfully predictably, threw the cycling world into the corner of the hood…just enjoy the fact that one of the most famous athletes people ride bicycles.

Central Midfield — Geoff Thomas


Geoff Thomas (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Leukemia and Lymphoma Research)

The cycling exploits of former Crystal Palace, Wolves and England midfielder Geoff Thomas are legendary. After recovering from leukemia, Thomas won the 2005 BBC Sports Personality of the Year Helen Rollason Award after raising £150,000 for leukemia research by riding the entire Tour de France route days before the race.

If that wasn’t enough, he’s done it several times since, and in 2017 he completed all three Grand Tours, racking up over 10,000km. In 2021 he was awarded an MBE for his charity work and this year’s Tour 21 event raised over £800,000 by the time the fundraising riders reached Paris. Sorry, Virgil, I changed my mind. Geoff’s captain.

Central Midfield — Remco Evenepoel


Remco Evenepoel wins 2022 World Championships in Wollongong (@cauldphoto/Specialized)

You didn’t think you’d get there without a Remco mention, did you?

As you are probably all too aware by now, the new world champion began his sporting journey on the football pitch, playing for local club RSC Anderlecht before crossing the border for PSV Eindhoven.

A defensive midfielder who could also play at left-back, Remco was apparently a fairly neat passer with a good left foot and solid set-piece delivery, his stamina moving him to the middle of the park since his debut as a golakeeper.

Either way, Remco fell in love with kicking a ball and started riding a bike as a teenager. A monument, a rainbow jersey and the Vuelta a España later, I think we’re all pretty happy he did…

Left Midfield – Arjen Robben

Yes, we know he played on the right and loved to step in, but we can’t have two right wingers… ‘Arjen man, beat your man and put him in the box’…

Speaking to the Daily Mail in 2004 while at Chelsea, Robben answered a questioning question about him cycling for training… “Why not? The new complex is very close to where I live with my girlfriend, and if the weather is nice, I can go back on my bike…

“When I started playing first-team football, I didn’t have a driver’s license. I had to go by bike. I used to cycle 10 kilometers every day to go to the school, and I was also going to bike practice.”

Robben scored 37 goals in 96 caps for… yes, you guessed it, the Netherlands, playing the full match as his country lost to Spain in the 2010 World Cup final.

Striker — Alan Shearer

At the end of Robben’s crosses, Big Al, the Premier League’s all-time top scorer and proud member of the N+1 club

Striker – Michael Owen

Up top alongside Shearer is another famous English name from the 90s/00s heartbreak era – Michael Owen. The man who made live blog headlines after diving when he forgot to unclip while returning home from a round.

Come on, referee, it must be a yellow…

Managers – Roberto Mancini / Neil Warnock

Every top team needs a great manager, but what about a double act? The Italian charmer wearing a Roberto Mancini scarf alongside Football League top fisherman Neil Warnock.

Mancini, the Premier League-winning manager who arrived at Manchester City’s training ground on his £2,500 road bike and cites Francesco Moser and Marco Pantani as his heroes.

Warnock, the companion promotion specialist who takes his ride to a more leisurely pace…

We think these two should be picked up for “Neil and Roberto’s Italian Adventure” by one of the more obscure ITV channels and spend the summer wandering the Italian countryside on their bikes, tasting wine and to reminisce about the good old days.

It’s our XI, but who have we missed? Get your suggestions, preferably a centre-back, in the comments. Don’t mention Kevin Keegan…

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Daniele Orsato: from electrician to referee Qatar’s first World Cup match https://classicitaliancycles.com/daniele-orsato-from-electrician-to-referee-qatars-first-world-cup-match/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 15:38:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/daniele-orsato-from-electrician-to-referee-qatars-first-world-cup-match/ When he was a child, Daniele Orsato was fascinated by the way “the lights went on” and his goal was to become an electrician. On the first day he realized his dream, spurred on by a colleague’s suggestion, he signed up for a football referee course on a lark. When the 46-year-old learned that he […]]]>

When he was a child, Daniele Orsato was fascinated by the way “the lights went on” and his goal was to become an electrician. On the first day he realized his dream, spurred on by a colleague’s suggestion, he signed up for a football referee course on a lark. When the 46-year-old learned that he would officiate in the Champions League final in Lisbon this year, he broke down in front of his children. On November 20, Orsato would officiate the Qatar World Cup opener between the hosts and the dark horses of Ecuador.

Born in Vicenza, Italy, he has been a FIFA referee since 2010 and this will be his first World Cup as a main referee. In Russia, in 2018, he was with the VAR. The Italian has been named the best referee of the 2020 season by the International Federation of Football History and Statistics.

“As a child I was curious to know why the light turned on and my goal was to become an electrician. I studied at the vocational training center in Trissino and then I found a job. The first day I put on the blue overalls and held my tool box in my hand, I left the house and waited in the driveway for my companions to pick me up. On this road, in the meantime, I thought I had achieved my dream” , he told Italian newspaper Corriere del Veneto.

It was then that a colleague suggested enrolling in the refereeing course and life changed again for Orsato. In the interview, he talks about when he learned about the Champions League final.

“I was training at Recoaro when I received a video call from Rossetti, the UEFA designator. He asked me a question, are you ready to play another game? I thought. “At this At that time, the only game to play was the cup final between Paris Saint-Germain and Bayern Munich!” I came home, sat on the bed and cried. When my children m saw with tears in their eyes, they knew right away that they had assigned me the final and we kissed,” he said.

“Today I am 46 years old and I am the oldest referee in the world although I have no problem with technical results and sports tests.” He will be 47 next Wednesday.

Corsato is known to be a referee who doesn’t believe in the draw and prefers to rely on VAR.

“In the field I am serious even abrupt, on a daily basis I am different, much more serene and more joyful. It’s the role I play for 90 minutes that makes me strict and sometimes even tough,” Daniele said.

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Donna L. Leskovec, Youngstown, Ohio Obituary https://classicitaliancycles.com/donna-l-leskovec-youngstown-ohio-obituary/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 18:16:40 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/donna-l-leskovec-youngstown-ohio-obituary/ YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – Donna L. Leskovec, a longtime resident of the area, died Wednesday, November 16, 2022 after a brief illness. Donna was born January 7, 1935 in Youngstown, the daughter of Crescenzo “Christy” and Angeline “Angela” (Alexander) Mancini. Raised on the west side of Youngstown, she was a 1952 graduate of Chaney High […]]]>

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – Donna L. Leskovec, a longtime resident of the area, died Wednesday, November 16, 2022 after a brief illness.

Donna was born January 7, 1935 in Youngstown, the daughter of Crescenzo “Christy” and Angeline “Angela” (Alexander) Mancini.

Raised on the west side of Youngstown, she was a 1952 graduate of Chaney High School where she was a cheerleader and choir member.

She married her high school sweetheart, William Leskovec and was married for 65 years until his death in September 2022.

For more than 50 years, she served as the Presiding Judge of the Mahoning County Board of Elections and worked at Mr. B’s Catering for 33 years, retiring in 1996.

She had been a resident of the Austintown community since 1961 and a founding member of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Austintown.

She was especially proud to be a granddaughter of Italian immigrant grandparents from Pacentro
(Abruzzo) and Roscigno (Campania) and enthusiastically embraced his rich Italian heritage which taught him the most important qualities in his life: compassion, warmth, hospitality and the importance of family. She instilled these same deeply rooted virtues and traditions in her own children and grandchildren.

An avid traveler, Donna and her husband have enjoyed their vacations to many places in the Caribbean, Hawaii and California, as well as their annual trip to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Besides travelling, she enjoyed water aerobics, going to casinos (local and remote), card club meetups, going to concerts and listening to Italian music. She watched it all
sports but especially loved Duke basketball. She was also an avid fan of Youngstown State and Ohio State athletics, as well as the Cleveland Guardians and Cleveland Cavaliers. Truly, her four greatest joys in life were her grandsons. She loved being their Nana; proud to cook their favorite Italian specialties and attend their many sporting and special events. She kept the strong family bond alive by often sharing stories of her own life’s journey.

For the past several years, Donna and her husband have been dedicated and dedicated caregivers to their recovering son, Brian, who predeceased her. She was also predeceased by her husband, William; parents, Christy and Angela (Alexander) Mancini; sister, Loretta (Mancini) Hartzell; brother, Howard Mancini; sisters-in-law, Josephine Mancini and Virginia Mancini; brother-in-law, Marvin Hartzell; son-in-law, James (Jim) Williams; nephew, Howard Hartzell and great-nephew, Michael Hartzell.

She was a loving mother, “Nana” and aunt who will be sadly missed by her daughter, Angela (Leskovec) Williams de Solon; grandsons, Christopher Leskovec of Delaware, Brennan Williams of Solon, Connor Williams of Titusville, Florida and Craig Leskovec of Delaware; brother, Herb (Mary Ann) Mancini of Youngstown; nephew and godson, Richard Mancini of Fort Myers, Florida and godson, Jeffrey Clark of Canfield, as well as many friends, nieces and nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews and cousins.

Family and friends can pay their respects to Donna on Sunday, November 20, 2022 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at Higgins-Reardon Funeral HomesAustintown Chapel, 4303 Mahoning Avenue in Austintown.

A Christian Burial Mass will be held the following day, Monday, November 21, 2022, at 11:00 a.m. at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 4545 New Road in Austintown, with the Reverend Michael Swierz officiating.

Entombment will take place after Mass at the Resurrection Cemetery in Austintown.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in her name to the American Diabetes Association or the American Cancer Society.

To send flowers to family or to plant a tree in memory of Donna L. Leskovec, please visit our flower shop.

A televised tribute will air on Friday, November 18 at the following approximate times: 6:47 a.m. on WYTV, 9:43 a.m. on WKBN, 10:58 a.m. on FOX, and 8:12 p.m. on MyYTV. The video will be posted here the day it is released.

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Four days of dining in Montevideo https://classicitaliancycles.com/four-days-of-dining-in-montevideo/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 17:20:53 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/four-days-of-dining-in-montevideo/ With improved air connections on the way, it should be easier than ever to travel to this diverse South American country in 2023. Improved access will catapult Montevideo’s laid-back beaches and under-the-radar food and wine scene will figure in the spotlight. at the top of travel wish lists. Lola Méndez takes you on a four-day […]]]>

With improved air connections on the way, it should be easier than ever to travel to this diverse South American country in 2023. Improved access will catapult Montevideo’s laid-back beaches and under-the-radar food and wine scene will figure in the spotlight. at the top of travel wish lists.

Lola Méndez takes you on a four-day culinary adventure, through South America’s secret foodie destination.

I am a dual Uruguayan-American citizen and travel journalist who has been on the road full-time for over seven years, visiting nearly 80 countries. Still Uruguay will always be at home. I’ve written about Uruguay’s delights for USA Today, Refinery29, Wine Enthusiast, and other publications — in addition to maintaining my own responsible travel blog, MissFilatelista.com.

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Why visit Montevideo

Montevideo is a metropolitan city – but in less than 30 minutes you can reach the leafy campo, where Uruguay’s countless cows and sheep graze on vast farmland. Nearby are vineyards where you can sample Uruguayan varieties of tannat and albariño or a pitcher of fruit-infused white wine sangria called clericó. Thanks to Uruguay’s 410 miles of coastline, you can enjoy freshly caught seafood in the once-walled city that juts out into the gigantic, ocean-like Río de la Plata. It’s disconcerting that Uruguay is still somehow a well-kept secret among foodies.

Montevideo Itinerary Overview Day 1

Cortado in a café-bookstore

Most hotels include a breakfast consisting of dulce medialunas (small sweet croissants), orange juice, toast, ham and cheese. Since Montevideo is flat and very walkable, take the 90-minute walk between the Ciudad Vieja and Buceo neighborhoods (you’ll likely be staying in one of these) for a good cup of coffee. To Escaramuza Books, stroll through the quaint bookstore and grab a table in the whimsical beer garden behind. Order a cortado – half milk and half coffee – and enjoy the slow pace of the Uruguayan way of life (yes, even in the “big” city) as you sip.

Chivito for the lunch

Whet your appetite before indulging in Uruguay’s national sandwich, the Chivito, for the lunch. Although the name translates to “little goat”, it does not include goat meat, but is instead piled high with beef, bacon, lettuce, tomatoes, eggs and cheese, and served on a bed of fries. Try it at one of Uruguay’s oldest fast-food chains, La Pasiva (18 de julio 1251 is a 25-minute walk from Escaramuza). Hang on a table near a window to people watch while you dig.

If you feel sleepy after lunch, do as the Uruguayans do and return to your hotel for a leisurely siesta.

Stroll the Rambla at dusk

From your hotel, walk down to La Rambla, Montevideo’s waterfront promenade which, at 22 km, is the longest continuous sidewalk in the world. You’ll pass by the skate park, the Montevideo letter board, the Holocaust memorial, and the mysterious Pittamiglio Castle. Try to be around Punta Brava at dusk for stunning views of the sun setting over the Río de la Plata.

Believe it or not, 9pm is early dinner time in Uruguay. After the sun goes down, order an Uber for the 10-minute drive to local haunt El Rastro Parrillita. Known for its excellent cuts of meat and average prices, this restaurant is where you can experience asado, the Uruguayan barbecue, and enjoy meat cooked to order on the parilla (grill). Order the grilled provolone cheese and the meat of your choice like the ojo de bife (steak) – then go for dessert with the flan drizzled with dulce de leche.

Overview of the Montevideo itinerary day 2

Time travel in Ciudad Vieja

Enjoy breakfast at the hotel before strolling through Puerta de la Ciudadela and Ciudad Vieja, Montevideo’s old town. Avoid Café Brasilero (renowned as Uruguay’s oldest but lackluster coffeehouse) and instead have your coffee at Café La Farmacia, a former apothecary turned cozy café.

Nearby is the Andes Museum 1972 which tells the harrowing story of the Uruguayan rugby team which lost 29 colleagues in a plane crash. Sixteen passengers survived turning to cannibalism until they were rescued 72 days after the crash.

Tribute to Anthony Bourdain at Jacinto

Stroll down Sarandí, Ciudad Vieja’s main pedestrian-only thoroughfare – and think of the legendary Anthony Bourdain, who bonded with Uruguay’s obsession with meat and loved bites pudding in particular. Dine where the chef did, at Jacinto, and be sure to order the Milanesea traditional dish of breaded steak or chicken.

Skip the siesta and participate in another national pastime, merienda. The mid-afternoon snack is usually a baked good such as a pionono (a layer of sponge cake rolled with dulce de leche) or ham and cheese miga’s sandwich accompanied by coffee. In Ciudad Vieja, one of the best merienda spots is the Federación bakery. Try one alfajorcomposed of two puff pastries filled with dulce de leche then rolled in coconut flakes.

Evening at the Mercado del Puerto in Montevideo

Touristy and a little expensive, the historic Montevideo Port Market, which opened in 1868, is still worth a visit. Grab a light dinner early at Empanadas Carolina: try the beef with raisins and ham with corn. Then, stroll a few blocks to the Montevideo Wine Experience to learn about Uruguayan wine culture and try varietals from some of the country’s most famous wineries. Bodega Garzón, for example, has won international awards and was the first LEED-certified winery in South America.

Montevideo Itinerary Overview Day 3

A modern day in Montevideo

After breakfast, stroll through the leafy urban space of Parque Rodó on your way to The Lab Coffee Roasters, located in the park, to enjoy a gourmet al fresco coffee. Next to it is the National Museum of Visual Artswhich houses a superb collection of Uruguayan art, including pieces by Pedro Figari and Juan Manuel Blanes. After your cultural outing, treat yourself to a mid-morning donut at the new women-owned In Her Oven bakery.

Lunch at Mercado Ferrando

Food markets are popular in Montevideo, with stalls offering parrillas, sushi, pizza, pasta, burgers, churros and more. From Parque Rodó, walk 20 minutes to Mercado Ferrando and head straight to Il Gufo to sample one of Uruguay’s culinary specialties: pizza a caballo. Almost half of all Uruguayans are of Italian descent, which has strongly influenced Uruguayan cuisine. But rest assured: this wood-fired pizza is not made with horse meat, but rather with mozzarella and lazy (chickpea crepe) on top. Celebrate Spanish Uruguayans with a dessert of dulce de leche stuffed churros.

Learn about Montevideo’s booming vegan scene

Although Uruguayans consume one of the highest amounts of meat of any population in the world, there is a thriving vegan scene in Montevideo and a handful of plant-based restaurants. Go green for the night with plant-based versions of Uruguayan cuisine like Milanese in La Temeraria. (And don’t skip the chocolate peanut butter cookie — you’ll find it hard to believe it’s vegan.) After dinner, stroll down España Boulevard to sample some of Uruguay’s best local beers at the Montevideo Brewery Company.

Montevideo Itinerary Overview Day 4

Celebrate the influence of immigrants on Uruguayan cuisine

Montevideo has a large Armenian immigrant population, and several have opened restaurants serving falafel, commonly a breakfast item in the Middle East and neighboring countries. Since Ararat opens at 11 a.m., sleep in then enjoy a falafel wrap with tabbouleh and hummus for brunch.

Taste the wine of Uruguay

Hop in an Uber heading north: in less than 30 minutes, you’ll be at beautiful Bodega Bouza. European colonization wreaked havoc on Uruguay, but left behind a wine culture that has only recently begun to gain international recognition. Indulge in lunch with wine pairing—which can include grilled duck breast with a glass of Monte Vide Eu 2019—then take a guided tour of the winery and vineyards. Enjoy the afternoon to soak up the serene scenery before returning to town for dinner.

Live noquis

If you are in Uruguay on the 29th of the month, there is only one dish for dinner: noquis. Dia de Ñoquis is a monthly tradition honoring the potato pasta dish imported by Italian immigrants, who at the end of the month would have nothing but potatoes and flour, which they would use to make big lots to share with newcomers. Newcomers would try to pay; when the hosts refused, they left coins under their plates. We still do it every month for good luck. Carry on the tradition with the superb potato dumplings of Morelia.

Want to go to Montevideo but wish there was someone to plan it for you? Let Lonely Planet’s sister company Somewhere else take some of the stress out of planning by connecting you with the best local expert to create the trip of your dreams.

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Brian Robinson obituary | Bike https://classicitaliancycles.com/brian-robinson-obituary-bike/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 17:38:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/brian-robinson-obituary-bike/ Brian Robinson, who died aged 91, was the first Briton to not only complete the Tour de France but then to win a stage of the Tour. His historic Tour completion came in 1955, when he fought for the finish in 29th place overall. Three years later, after numerous trials on and off the road, […]]]>

Brian Robinson, who died aged 91, was the first Briton to not only complete the Tour de France but then to win a stage of the Tour.

His historic Tour completion came in 1955, when he fought for the finish in 29th place overall. Three years later, after numerous trials on and off the road, he won a Tour stage victory on a section from St Brieuc to Brest, followed by another in 1959, from Annecy to Chalon-sur-Saône.

In doing so, he paved the way for other Britons to leave their mark on the sport in continental Europe over the following decades.

Born in Mirfield, West yorkshire, Brian was the son of Emily (née Backhouse), a World War II munitions worker, and Henry Robinson, a carpenter and builder. They were a family of cyclists and Henry fostered the road racing instincts of Brian and his brother Desmond, both members of the Huddersfield Road Club.

But Henry also insisted that Brian be apprenticed as a carpenter for six years. In addition, he had to undertake national service, and it was not until 1953 that he fully committed himself to professional cycling.

Along with Desmond, Brian had represented Britain as an amateur at the Helsinki Olympics in 1952, but insularity and confused attitudes had kept Britain out of professional cycling in continental Europe. However, Brian took the standpoint of the rebellious British League of Racing Cyclists, whose members had broader horizons. Fourth in the Tour de Bretagne in 1952 and second in 1954, he set his sights on the Tour de France.

Hercules, the successful British cycle manufacturer, had by then begun to build a team capable of racing overseas, and Robinson joined. During the winter of 1954-55, he and his teammates went to a training camp at Les Issambres in southern France. The village was favored by French cycling professionals, which other British cyclists preferred to avoid. But Robinson felt he could make progress by getting to know his rivals; so he began to learn French himself and fraternized with them.

During the 1955 Tour de France, the 10 members of the British team were upgraded. None of them had known such fierce competition, and they had no idea of ​​the difficulties of the Alps and the Pyrenees.

Only two have even reached the finals in Paris – Robinson and born in Hampshire Tony Hoar. Robinson had come close to dropping out of the race at various times, but had been helped for days by Hoar’s good humor.

They both completed the event, with Hoar as red lantern in 69th and last place. The two received a particularly warm welcome when they entered the Parc des Princes in Paris. Eighteen years after Charles Holland and Bill Burl became the first Britons to enter racing, it was a special moment in the Entente Cordiale and marked the start of a new era in British cycling.

Despite this achievement, the Hercules team quickly disbanded amid recriminations. Robinson spent the winter of 1955–56 in Mirfield, working in his father’s business and hoping for future campaigns in Europe.

In 1955 he married fellow club cyclist, Sheila Fearnley, who experienced – living mostly in a caravan – the hardships of a racer’s life.

For the next two years Robinson traveled to try and earn money in minor French racing, often forced to sleep in fields and barns when funds were low.

In the spring of 1956, he raced for a minor team in the Vuelta a España, a chaotic tour of Spain controlled by Franco’s Guardia Civil. His bravery in this competition earned him a race for the international team in the 1956 Tour de France, in which he finished 14th, and the following year he shone in the Italian Milan-San Remo event, finishing third then that he could have won on a luckier day.

In 1957 and 1958, he had to abandon the Tour de France, victim of falls and exhaustion each time. Nevertheless, before his retirement in 1958 came his stage victory in the 170km seventh section through Brittany, in which he initially finished second but moved into first when Italian rider Arigo Padovan, who had crossed the line in the lead , was penalized for earlier forcing Robinson into the barriers.

If it was a hollow victory, in 1959 Robinson proved that it was no accident by winning the 20th stage of 202 km which ended in Chalon-sur-Saône. Feeling at dawn that the day could be his, he fitted his lightest wheels and tires and engineered a decisive solo breakaway, finishing 20 minutes ahead of the peloton.

It was a race of commanding strength rather than brilliance, and Robinson said he had prepared for it years before in the British time trial.

In 1961, he won his most prestigious victory, during the seven-day Critérium de Dauphiné Libéré in the south-east of France.

After almost eight years of a grueling professional career, Robinson was beginning to feel the strains of his grueling schedule and his performance was gradually beginning to decline. But as a confirmed rider, well known in France and respected by all the great professionals of the time, he had acquired a great knowledge of a sport that was both heroic and corrupt.

An honest competitor and a man of principle, he was well placed to guide the inexperienced British riders who, from the late 1950s, tried to follow in his wake. The most distinguished of his proteges was Tom Simpson, who went on to become one of Britain’s most successful cyclists.

However, at the age of 33 and having earned little money from his sport, Robinson decided to return to Mirfield and his first vocation as a carpenter. Later, he kept in touch with other former professionals at the annual ski meetings in Switzerland, and it was also his pleasure, until his 80s, to ride with his teammates from Huddersfield on the hilly roads of the Yorkshire that he had known since he was a boy. .

Robinson was particularly celebrated when the Tour de France visited Yorkshire in 2014 and received many tributes from young British riders such as Mark Cavendish and Sir Bradley Wiggins.

Brian and Shirley had three children, Michelle, Martin and Louise. They divorced in 1974; the following year Brian married Audrey Oldroyd and had three stepchildren, Elizabeth, Mark and Amanda.

Audrey is survived by her children and stepchildren, as are her grandchildren, Rebecca and Jake, who have cycled in events all over the world, and five step-grandchildren. Desmond died in 2015.

Brian Robinson, cyclist, born November 3, 1930; died on October 25, 2022

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Italian navy officer charged in Moray crash that killed five people, whose son denies falling asleep at the wheel https://classicitaliancycles.com/italian-navy-officer-charged-in-moray-crash-that-killed-five-people-whose-son-denies-falling-asleep-at-the-wheel/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 15:44:17 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/italian-navy-officer-charged-in-moray-crash-that-killed-five-people-whose-son-denies-falling-asleep-at-the-wheel/ An Italian tourist has claimed he found himself driving on a “very dangerous” road in the dark north of Scotland before a crash that left five passengers dead, including one of his sons. Alfredo Ciociola denied falling asleep or repeatedly driving on the wrong side of the A96 before the collision near Drummuir Junction near […]]]>

An Italian tourist has claimed he found himself driving on a “very dangerous” road in the dark north of Scotland before a crash that left five passengers dead, including one of his sons.

Alfredo Ciociola denied falling asleep or repeatedly driving on the wrong side of the A96 before the collision near Drummuir Junction near Keith, Moray.

He said it was possible he was disoriented by the headlights of the oncoming car. He maintained that he had been very careful partly because of the road “which for me was very dangerous”.

He says he asked his wife, who was in the back of the minibus he was driving with their two sons, if they were sleeping. When she didn’t answer, he checked his mirror.

He told the Edinburgh High Court: ‘It was dark out back so I couldn’t see anything. I had seen the other car and it was right in front of me when it came around the bend.

Ciociola, 50, an Italian navy officer who works with the coast guard, said: “I saw the lighthouses. They were very strong. I lost my orientation. I was sure, I was convinced that we were on the same path and instinctively I went to the right.

He said after the crash he asked if everyone was okay, but only his front passenger, Francesco Patane, answered.

His lawyer, Ian Duguid KC, asked him how he felt about the deaths of three people in the car he hit. Ciociola said, through an interpreter: “It’s the most terrible thing you can hear and the pain of the families is also my pain.”

During cross-examination, Assistant Attorney Derick Nelson told Ciociola that if he had kept his eyes on the road, he would have seen the lights coming his way sooner. He answered: “yes”.

But he later said in evidence: “I did something that I do a lot of times when I’m driving. I check in the rearview mirror and keep my eyes on the road ahead of me at the same time.

Ciociola’s eldest son, Lorenzo, four, died in the crash along with Mr Patane’s wife, Frances Saliba, 63. Lorenzo’s younger brother Frederico, three, escaped with minor injuries.

Morag Smith who was driving the Nissan SUV he collided with was seriously injured and his three passengers Audrey Appleby, Edward Reid and Evalyn Collie died.

Ciociola’s wife, Concetta, was also seriously injured but has given birth to another son since the collision on July 26, 2018. He is now two years old.

Ciociola, who was also injured, denied causing the death by dangerous driving. It is alleged that on the A96 he did not pay enough attention to the road ahead, fell asleep and repeatedly braked and turned onto the opposite carriageway.

He said he had very limited driving experience in Scotland on a previous visit. They had planned a tour of the country which would pass through Edinburgh, Inverness, Orkney and Argyll and he was driving from Stonehaven to Inverness when the accident happened before midnight.

Mr. Duguid asked him if he thought the A96 was dangerous and he replied: “Very dangerous. I tried to be as careful as possible. I tried to pay attention to everything around me as much as possible.

Ciociola told the court: “I have been driving on the right for over 30 years. It’s not easy to get used to driving on the left, especially when you’re on a narrow street.

Ciociola said his wife, who was still in a coma when she was flown back to Italy on September 24, 2018 before regaining consciousness, does not remember she came to Scotland.

The trial before Lord Mulholland continues.

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Austin Peay professor set to publish two new books https://classicitaliancycles.com/austin-peay-professor-set-to-publish-two-new-books/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 18:02:04 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/austin-peay-professor-set-to-publish-two-new-books/ Something was wrong. Several men huddled around an ambulance, pouring water into the radiator. It was 2 a.m., and from across the road a guard posted at the gate of Camp Campbell watched the men groping in the dark. He had grown more wary of strangers — especially strangers traveling at night — since the […]]]>

Something was wrong. Several men huddled around an ambulance, pouring water into the radiator. It was 2 a.m., and from across the road a guard posted at the gate of Camp Campbell watched the men groping in the dark. He had grown more wary of strangers — especially strangers traveling at night — since the start of World War II. The guard watched these men, and maybe he thought he heard someone whispering in German as they tried to fix this overheated ambulance. Instead of crossing the road, the guard took his radio.

“So he looks at it and thinks it’s a little suspicious, so he calls it,” said Austin Peay State University history professor Dr. Antonio Thompson. “He called him, and no ambulance was sent, so he turned himself in and there’s four escaped prisoners, and he said to them, ‘Bring this thing back and I’ll follow you. Things like that happened.

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The Guardian take on Rishi Sunak’s Cop27 journey: Putting the planet on a path to hell | Editorial https://classicitaliancycles.com/the-guardian-take-on-rishi-sunaks-cop27-journey-putting-the-planet-on-a-path-to-hell-editorial/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 21:46:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/the-guardian-take-on-rishi-sunaks-cop27-journey-putting-the-planet-on-a-path-to-hell-editorial/ Rishi Sunak is not interested in the climate emergency – and everyone knows it. Forced to make a whirlwind visit to COP27, Mr. Sunak’s intransigence made him a pariah at the UN summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. He met Emmanuel Macron in France and the far-right Italian Prime Minister, Giorgia Melon, to bring up a […]]]>

Rishi Sunak is not interested in the climate emergency – and everyone knows it. Forced to make a whirlwind visit to COP27, Mr. Sunak’s intransigence made him a pariah at the UN summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. He met Emmanuel Macron in France and the far-right Italian Prime Minister, Giorgia Melon, to bring up a subject – “illegal immigration” – which Mr. Sunak obviously cares about. But most world leaders were not going to give time to a Prime Minister who had prevented the new British monarch from attending the summit and only came because he feared being eclipsed by Boris Johnson. When Mr. Sunak showed up, it was with his predecessor’s plan and slogans. Embarrassingly, Mr Johnson took center stage at Cop27 – from behind the scenes.

The Prime Minister’s record reveals a politician who governs in the narrow political interest of the Conservatives rather than the national interest. To cut fuel and air taxes as chancellor just days before the latest cop summit – hosted by the UK – showed his true colors. Pledges to limit onshore wind and solar development during the Tory leadership campaign signaled that personal ambition was more important than climate goals. At COP26, countries pledged to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to limit global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial temperatures. Britain had wantedkeep 1.5C alive”. Mr. Sunak seems to want her dead.

In power, he hastened the decline of the green agenda, ousting Cop26 President Alok Sharma and Climate Minister Graham Stuart from the cabinet. Cabinet committees are where political arguments are debated. Under Mr Johnson there was two cabinet committees dedicated to the climate, one chaired by Mr. Sharma and the other by the Prime Minister. But now “net zero” has been incorporated into a committee on “home and economic affairs”, with a focus on energy security. Mr Sunak cynically uses the war in Ukraine to say Britain should be self-sufficient on its own fossil fuels. But Britain should reduce its dependence on carbon-based energy and help end the climate emergency.

Mr Johnson told his Red Sea audience that ‘now is not the time to leave wobbly on net zero”. Mr. Sunak is shaking and wobbling. Its plans to extract more oil and gas from the North Sea are not compatible with the UK’s net zero commitment. The construction of a coal mine in Cumbria. Extracting carbon dioxide from the atmosphere may expand the space for positive emissions, but the technology is far from being deployed.

A global political crisis of energy transition is brewing. “The extinction of humanitylooms, but Britain is counting the beans. As Mr Sunak says he will spend the £11billion promised by Mr Johnson to help poorer countries adapt to global warming, he won’t say he will stick to the five-year plan to pay out the money. If the money is spread over a longer period, it will mean cuts in climate finance. It will hurt the poorest people in the world. Mr Sunak could sell it as more money to the British. Charity can start at home, but what if your house is on fire?

The UK government is playing a confidence trick that risks trapping the world in fossil fuel addiction. Mr Sunak pretends to talk about environmental issues while peddling green charade policies and economic bloodshed. This type of policy opens, in the words of UN Secretary General António Guterres, the climate highway to hell.

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World Cup Road Trip, Day 2: In Paris by underwater train in search of Mbappé https://classicitaliancycles.com/world-cup-road-trip-day-2-in-paris-by-underwater-train-in-search-of-mbappe/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 05:17:36 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/world-cup-road-trip-day-2-in-paris-by-underwater-train-in-search-of-mbappe/ The first day of the insane plan we call Planes, Trains And Automobiles was long, starting and ending in London but covering 449 miles, starting at 6am and ending around 9pm. And yet, this absurd journey didn’t quite seem to begin until we left the occasional hellscape of the UK, arriving for the first Eurostar […]]]>

The first day of the insane plan we call Planes, Trains And Automobiles was long, starting and ending in London but covering 449 miles, starting at 6am and ending around 9pm.

And yet, this absurd journey didn’t quite seem to begin until we left the occasional hellscape of the UK, arriving for the first Eurostar in the third country on our list: France.

There we were joined by Jon, our security detail, whose job it is to make sure we finish this trip more or less in one piece.

Considering he spent five months of this year dodging missiles in Ukraine, hopefully it will be relatively simple for him to guide three idiots across two continents to a football tournament.

The Eurostar then, which even a few decades after its opening still arouses a feeling of childish joy.

It’s a train that goes under water! To another country!

It’s one of those standardized things that’s probably perfectly simple but also feels like real magic, like WiFi or 3D printing. When you think that the seemingly brightest minds of this generation are dabbling in trying to charge people $8 a month to feel important on social media, you can’t help but think that humanity has done a few steps back.

After reaching Paris and resolving a minor travel-related issue (read: we forgot to book train tickets and the possibility of the Qatar trip ending extremely prematurely looms), we head north out of the town center and towards Bondy.

At first glance, it is a popular, rather pleasant but relatively unremarkable suburb, one of the many areas called suburbs that encircle the center of Paris.

But Bondy, as you may already know, is the suburb where arguably the most exciting footballer has emerged from competing in the next world Cup.

It’s a wild swing in the dark, but we may not be the first group of journalists to make the pilgrimage to AS Bondy.

“For Mbappé?” said Sophian, who was carefully mowing the grass on said club’s immaculate main ground when we approached him and explained who we are and why we came here.

They must have a lot.

Kylian Mbappe was 15 when he left Bondy to sign for Monaco, but even now, almost a decade later, their ground has become a destination of minor pilgrimage, a symbol of the extraordinary chain of emerging talent neighborhoods around Paris.

Sophian pauses to patiently answer our questions and her face lights up when we tell her that Laurie is Athleticismit is Manchester United corresponding. “We gave you Kylian Mbappe, you gave us Gary Neville!” he exclaims. We have to assume that he considers this a good thing.

A few gentle negotiations begin to satisfy our childish instincts.

We brought with us two editions of the 2022 World Cup official ball, Al Rihla, hanging from Nick’s backpack. One is for the people we meet and talk to on this signing journey, the other is for as many kicks as we can along the way. And what more appropriate place is there to have a kick than the pitch on which Mbappe learned his game.

Initially, Sophian is reluctant.

But then he says he has to leave for a few minutes to get some equipment.

There is no one else around.

It’s the wink we’ve been waiting for and we spend a few enjoyable minutes sabotaging the ball on the grass. Laurie buries a left-footed shot into the empty net. Nick goes for a Panenka but scuffs it. We both celebrate wildly anyway.

As we leave, a young man, Mohamed, approaches and asks if we speak Italian. It is one of the seven languages ​​that Martino, our videographer, has in his locker. Mohamed has just arrived from Verona in northern Italy and is eager to find out how he can join AS Bondy. He came here because of the reputation of the club.

At this point, we vaguely suspect that someone has tricked us or that some benevolent journalistic deity has sent us the perfect manifestation of what we seek as we visit the ground where Mbappe grew up.

Here is a kid who has traveled a lot, who wants to play football and chose the club made famous by Mbappé. It’s almost too perfect.

We walk 10 minutes up the road to see Mbappe’s vast mural painted on the side of a building. It depicts a young Mbappe dreaming of winning the World Cup, with the slogan ‘love your dream, and he will love you back’ – love your dream, and he will love you back.

Yet there is a reminder that Mbappe is not universally popular: in the lower corner of the mural there are two graffiti: one of them reads “Thomasin, you are not my mother”, which probably doesn’t concern him, but the other one does. ‘Mbappe tes mort’ – Mbappe is dead. Some may not have forgiven him for his recent banter with the departure of Paris Saint-Germain.

Opposite the mural is Harry’s Cafe, where we were told people were happy to talk about Mbappe. But even we didn’t expect the first person we approached to be an AS Bondy coach, himself coached by Wilfried Mbappe, Kylian’s father. Goalkeeper Youssouf calls Mbappe senior a ‘man of principles’ who, together with his son, ‘created this culture of hard work at the club that sets the standard’. He says the kids want to join Bondy because of their reputation for excellence and the belief that through hard work they will become better.

You may not see Kylian Mbappe often in his old suburbs, but his influence remains. He is literally looking over the things in this mural.

He and his family created the culture that made his former club so successful. And its influence is such that young men from hundreds of miles away looking for a place to play football are drawn to it.

(Graphic: Sam Richardson)

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New Jersey’s Best Food Events in November https://classicitaliancycles.com/new-jerseys-best-food-events-in-november/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 19:35:01 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/new-jerseys-best-food-events-in-november/ Make the most of the state’s culinary scene with these special menus, alcohol-centric meals and more. November 1 to 7; all the month Until November 7, this Italian tapas bar will be offering fig specialties, including prosciutto and fig pizza and a fig mule. Until the end of the month, the restaurant also offers a […]]]>

Make the most of the state’s culinary scene with these special menus, alcohol-centric meals and more.

November 1 to 7; all the month

Until November 7, this Italian tapas bar will be offering fig specialties, including prosciutto and fig pizza and a fig mule. Until the end of the month, the restaurant also offers a truffle menu in honor of Italy’s annual truffle festivals; dishes include fig and mascarpone bruschetta, truffle burrata, cacio e pepe, seared duck breast and chocolate terrine.
70 Kingsland Road (Clifton Commons), Clifton; 973-661-2435

November 2, 6–8.30 p.m.

This event will kick off the launch of Kingfisher, a special Maker’s Mark bourbon, with craft cocktails and hot bourbon cider. Executive Chef Seadon Shouse will serve oysters, steak tartare, smoked salmon, squash risotto balls and more. Tickets are $60 per person and can be purchased online.
225 River Street (W Hotel), Hoboken; 201-253-2500

November 3, 6:30 p.m.

Osteria Morini is teaming up with Amanti Vino, a specialty wine boutique in Montclair and Morristown, for this pairing dinner. Dishes will include grilled octopus, scallop affumicato, braised short ribs and sweet cheese fried ravioli. Dinner is $75 for wine, plus $75 for food per person. For reservations, call Amanti Vino at 973-267-9463.
107 Morristown Road, Bernardsville; 908-221-0040

November 3

Magician John Stessel will stop by this restaurant in southern Orange for a special show. During the show, guests can sip cocktails by Mission Spirits and enjoy a three-course dinner by Chef Christopher Welz. Tickets are $100 per person; call the restaurant to make a reservation.
19 Valley Street, South Orange; 973-419-6773

November 5, 11am-3pm

This chocolate factory is celebrating its 25th anniversary. The event will include a live radio broadcast from Thunder 106, a prize wheel, party favors, face paint and a special birthday cake made by J&M Bakery. Discounts will be offered on Suzi’s products, and guests can indulge in a chocolate tasting.
1100 Hwy 35 South (village mall), Middletown; 732-796-0115

Chili Fall CookingMeadowlands Racecourse • East Rutherford

November 5

Chili competitors can enter in three different categories: Homestyle ($1,000 grand prize), Chili Verde ($1,000 grand prize), and Salsa ($500 grand prize). At the event, guests can taste and vote on chili peppers; their fan favorite will walk away with a prize of $250. The three grand prize winners will earn a spot in the International Chili Society’s 2023 Annual World Championship.
1 Racetrack Drive, East Rutherford; 201-843-2446

November 6, 11 a.m.

For the 8th year in a row, Cancer Support Community New Jersey at Gilda’s Club (CSCNJ) is hosting its annual brunch fundraiser. This year, Jim and Amy Malamut will be honored for their dedication to philanthropy. You can enjoy gourmet bites, a Bloody Mary bar and mimosas. The event is limited to the first 250 people; Tickets can be purchased online. The cost is $110 per person or $200 for a pair. All profits will go to the CSCNJ.
500 Shore Drive, Linwood; 609-927-6134

November 18, 6 p.m.

La Mer’s waterfront restaurant, the Pier House, hosts a four-course dinner with whiskey. Dishes will include stuffed quail, watercress salad with smoked peck, gorgonzola and maple pepper vinaigrette, chilli-crusted pork rib eye and peach and blueberry clafoutis. Dinner is $85 per person; One must reserve.
1317 Beach Avenue, Cape May; 609-898-2244

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