Italian Cycle – Classic Italian Cycles http://classicitaliancycles.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 02:08:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://classicitaliancycles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-141x136.png Italian Cycle – Classic Italian Cycles http://classicitaliancycles.com/ 32 32 12 Must-Try Dishes At Eataly Silicon Valley, According To An Italian Food Expert | Peninsula Foodist | The peninsula foodist https://classicitaliancycles.com/12-must-try-dishes-at-eataly-silicon-valley-according-to-an-italian-food-expert-peninsula-foodist-the-peninsula-foodist/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 22:31:06 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/12-must-try-dishes-at-eataly-silicon-valley-according-to-an-italian-food-expert-peninsula-foodist-the-peninsula-foodist/ By Anthony Shu Neapolitan pizza is made with imported Italian buffalo mozzarella. Photo by Magali Gauthier. Eataly has finally opened its long-awaited three-story food hall at Westfield Valley Fair. Spanning 45,000 square feet and home to a rooftop restaurant, Eataly Silicon Valley offers Italian food lovers the chance to shop, browse specialties, and enjoy wine, […]]]>

By Anthony Shu

Neapolitan pizza is made with imported Italian buffalo mozzarella. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Eataly has finally opened its long-awaited three-story food hall at Westfield Valley Fair. Spanning 45,000 square feet and home to a rooftop restaurant, Eataly Silicon Valley offers Italian food lovers the chance to shop, browse specialties, and enjoy wine, pizza, and ice cream all in one place. .

A store with over 10,000 products can be overwhelming, so we enlisted the help of Viola Buitoni, an Italian food expert who teaches cooking classes in San Francisco and Italy. She will publish a cookbook called “Italy by Ingredient” next year and is the food expert advisor to the Italian consulate in San Francisco. We visited Eataly as part of a media tour before the store opened.

From dried pasta to fresh fish, here’s Buitoni’s guide to Eataly’s must-haves:

Pope’s Salt: According to Buitoni, naming a food after a religious service means that the food is “very tasty and a little (a little) secret”. In Italy, religious leaders historically received the best products, usually for free.

Pope’s Salt has less of the bitter mineral flavor that defines many other salts since it comes from the Adriatic Sea. Buitoni uses it to season already brackish fish and earthy root vegetables.

Pizza: Eataly’s Neapolitan pizza is made in partnership with the Neapolitan chain Rossopomodoro, and the buffalo mozzarella is imported from Italy because the store was unable to recreate it locally (fresh mozzarella is made in-store from milk From a cow.)

Buitoni likes the mozzarella that tops Eataly’s pizzas and says cheese should be judged by its milk. It shouldn’t squeak when bitten into it either.

Umbrian lentils: Perhaps Buitoni’s favorite item in the entire store, these lenses hail from his home region of Umbria. She says they stay whole, cook in 20 minutes, and don’t need to be soaked.

Buitoni recommends sautéing the intensely flavored lentils with pancetta, bay leaf, tomato paste and flavorings such as celery, carrot, onions or garlic. She then deglazes the pan with red wine and slowly braises the lentils in a little water.


Campofilone pappardelle is wrapped to preserve the delicate shape of the pasta. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Dry pasta: Buitoni carefully examines each box of pasta for streaks and imperfections. She points to the rough edges and streaks of white and yellow in pasta made by Campofilone as an example of what she is looking for. These details show the use of real eggs and that the pasta has not been overworked. Provenance is also important and many of Eataly’s selections come from Gragnano, a territory known for its dry pasta.

A surprising note from Buitoni, pasta makers love American wheat from Manitoba, which has a high protein content that creates strong gluten development. She says that in general, pasta made only with Italian grains has a more intense flavor, but the lack of high-protein flour can affect the texture. Finally, she recommends looking for canned rather than bagged pasta, especially when buying flimsy forms.

mandarinata: While Buitoni finds most American sodas too sweet, this sparkling citrus drink is his go-to for a refreshing summer drink.

All kinds of tomatoes: Buitoni points out that even among the famous San Marzano tomatoes, some producers create better products than others. It highlights the Gustarosso brand supported by the cooperative for its long-standing relationships with farmers.

She also loves the triple-concentrated tomato paste, which provides “unmatched” depth of flavor and is hard to find here in the US. She particularly recommends it to vegetarians looking to add richness to their dishes.

At the end of the tomato aisle, Buitoni points to water-packed datterino tomatoes. She says companies packing pureed tomatoes could be using substandard tomatoes for the surrounding puree. These little tomatoes cook quickly over high heat with oil and garlic or can be mashed raw and smeared on bread.

Scorpionfish/rockfish and monkfish: Both of these fish are found in the Mediterranean, and Buitoni finds them delicious in acqua pazza, poached in tomatoes and water with black olives, garlic and basil. She also roasts them with potatoes and zucchini.


Orecchiette di grana arso gets its darker color from burnt wheat. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Orecchiette di grana arso: Made from “burnt wheat”, this pasta comes from Puglia and signifies the ingenuity of commoners and sharecroppers. Burning the fields was part of the agricultural cycle of the region and the inhabitants collected the remains of wheat. However, as economic conditions improved, grana arso became associated with poverty and began to disappear as a culinary tradition. About 10 to 15 years ago, the locals started picking up the tradition of grana arso and started producing this ashy-tasting pasta that complements the wild herbs and bitter vegetables common in Puglia.

Balsamic vinegar: Buitoni says to look for both the word “traditional” and the exclusive round bottles that mark the highest qualities of balsamic vinegar. Extravecchio vinegar from Modena is aged for at least 25 years and sells for $199 a bottle at Eataly. Buitoni compares these vinegars and their slightly younger relatives to dark honey and says they’re the only ones you should pay a really high price for. Cheaper alternatives are suitable for cooking and making heated sauces.

Hazelnuts from Piedmont: Buitoni appreciates these hazelnuts as snacks, in baking, on yogurts and in salads and sauces. They are said to have a richer flavor than most commercially produced hazelnuts.


Passion fruit ice cream served with a garnish of edible flowers. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Gelato: Eataly Silicon Valley’s gelato section sets itself apart from counters in other megastore locations thanks to a partnership with third-generation gelato chef Patrizia Pasqualetti. A San Francisco resident and former ice cream maker at the city’s GIO Gelati, Pasqualetti went freelance and continued the family tradition of creating seasonal sweets by opening boutiques in Yountville and Malibu.

Marvis toothpaste: The end of a good day of meals must end with good hygiene, and Marvis toothpaste is a must in Buitoni’s suitcase when he returns from Italy. The brand’s traditional flavors include ginger, cinnamon and Amarelli licorice.

Eataly Silicon Valley, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara; 650-456-9200. Instagram: @eatalysiliconvalley.

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ATR, Braathens and Neste operate the first 100% SAF regional aircraft flight https://classicitaliancycles.com/atr-braathens-and-neste-operate-the-first-100-saf-regional-aircraft-flight/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:21:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/atr-braathens-and-neste-operate-the-first-100-saf-regional-aircraft-flight/ Photo: ATR RTA Type of company Planner Creation date nineteen eighty one CEO Stefano Bortoli Head office location Toulouse, France In a milestone for regional aviation and sustainability, French-Italian aerospace manufacturer ATR, together with Swedish regional airline Braathens and fuel supplier Neste, operated a flight powered by 100 aviation fuel on Tuesday % sustainable. The […]]]>

In a milestone for regional aviation and sustainability, French-Italian aerospace manufacturer ATR, together with Swedish regional airline Braathens and fuel supplier Neste, operated a flight powered by 100 aviation fuel on Tuesday % sustainable. The flight took off from Malmö Airport (MMX) at 10:36 a.m. and took 1 hour and 11 minutes before landing in Stockholm Bromma (BMA) at 11:47 a.m.

A new era of sustainable fuel

Flight TF133 from MMX to BMA is generally a fairly standard Swedish regional air commuter affair. However, on Tuesday, June 21 (the summer solstice), 2022, he made aviation history. In a collaboration between an OEM, an airline and a fuel supplier, a prototype ATR 72-600 aircraft flew the distance on 100% SAF, which means zero fossil-based jet fuel. ATR Chief Executive Stefano Bortoli said:

SIMPLEFLYING VIDEO OF THE DAY

“Today is a historic day for aviation. After more than a century of kerosene-powered commercial flight, we are on the cusp of a new era. In recent months, we have completed a series of successful flights with sustainable aviation fuel in one engine. We have now decided that it is time to perform the first test flight with 100% SAF in both engines. (…) The flight represents a real milestone for the entire aviation industry as it shows that this technology works and can be quickly adopted by many players in our industry to accelerate the transition to low-emission aviation.

The 100% SAF flight over southern Sweden lasted 1h11. Photo:
FlightRadar24.com

Towards 100% certification in three years

The flight, devoid of paying passengers, was operated by SE-MKK, a six-year-old ATR 72-600 powered by Pratt & Whitney PW127M engines. It was originally destined for Taiwan’s folded TransAsia Airways but was never picked up. Instead, he was lucky enough to become the hero of a series of test flights that began in 2021, intended to lead to 100% SAF certification by 2025.

The flight was a test flight that was part of a collaboration between the aircraft manufacturer, the airline operator and the fuel supplier. Photo: ATR

Jonathan Wood, Vice President of Neste Europe Renewable Aviation shared the following statement:

“When used in pure form, at 100% concentration as in this test flight, Neste MY Sustainable Aviation Fuel reduces greenhouse gas emissions over its life cycle by up to 80 % compared to the use of fossil jet fuel, and additionally offers non-CO2 benefits through significant reduction in particulate emissions, etc. (…) Test flights like this show that it is possible to fly safely with 100% SAF and help accelerate the adoption of SAF in aviation.”

ATR hopes to certify its aircraft for 100% SAF 2025. Photo: ATR

Flight crew

Of course, a theft doesn’t just happen because of airframe and fuel. On board the aircraft were ATR chief pilot Cyril Cizabuiroz, co-pilot Jean-Marie Marre and flight test mechanic Pascal Daussin. The specific results and data collected during today’s flight will be analyzed later.

Per G Braathen, President of Braathens Regional Airlines, said:

“As Sweden’s leading national airline, our sustainability goal began long before any other airline, and this milestone is one of the main pillars and represents true innovation for the industry. It has proven that 100% SAF is the most immediate and effective option we have to reduce CO2 emissions and move faster to a carbon-free industry.”

What do you think of the 100% SAF flight? Is this the way forward to reduce CO2 emissions from aviation? Leave a comment below and join the conversation regarding the future of the industry.

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Brazil’s Tite: ‘We have reached the World Cup – now it’s time to be champions’ | Brazil https://classicitaliancycles.com/brazils-tite-we-have-reached-the-world-cup-now-its-time-to-be-champions-brazil/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 19:23:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/brazils-tite-we-have-reached-the-world-cup-now-its-time-to-be-champions-brazil/ A few months before the World Cup, how are you? How do you manage your anxiety? How am I? I am impatient but focused. We reached the World Cup; now is the time to reach the final and be champion. It’s the truth. At the last World Cup, I was the coach because of other […]]]>

A few months before the World Cup, how are you? How do you manage your anxiety? How am I? I am impatient but focused. We reached the World Cup; now is the time to reach the final and be champion. It’s the truth. At the last World Cup, I was the coach because of other circumstances [Dunga was fired in 2016 and Tite took over]. Now I had the opportunity to do the full four-year cycle. Expectations are high but the focus is on hard work.

I have staff with great values ​​and references. And an amazing family. If I didn’t have my wife [Rosi], I would not be where I am. I get angry, I bang on the roof, I don’t sleep at night, like everyone else. But I have a partner who supports me, a family who supports me. I draw my strength from my family, my work and my spirituality.

Are you afraid of something? The pressure we face is a problem: the responsibility, the pressure of the job, the demands. When I was a supporter, I wanted the team to be the best. This is what affects us. But mental health is important. I think of what Mandela said: “Courage is the ability to face fear. In every decision he made, fear was present. When I read that, I saw that I was a normal citizen. I have my fears, my nightmares, my little goosebumps. Fear but not fear; fear and dread are different.

I also read what Tostão [a Brazil legend who won the 1970 World Cup] said: “Fame creates a division of the human being – it builds up a creature and impoverishes creation.” I have to take care of Adenor [Tite’s real first name]. Adenor has a life: he will continue to be a father, a grandfather. But he does not want to be measured. If he wins, he’s the best. Otherwise, he is reviled. I can’t understand it. When I speak, I speak for my whole team. Nobody has a monopoly on the truth. We need to think about different opinions and we are open to well-argued ideas. It’s not about winning at all costs.

Alex Ferguson says great professionals compete in a constant quest for improvement. Do you know why? If I compare myself to someone else, I will be frustrated and hurt. On some points I will be better, but on others I will be worse. I need to stay healthy, with a healthy mind.

Do you feel bad when you get criticized like last year? We need time to understand. Works are best seen when they are remote, complete. We have results. What are people waiting for? We broke the record [for the most points] in the playoffs. We have the longest unbeaten streak: 12 games [under Tite in qualifying for the 2018 World Cup] and now 17 games unbeaten [in the 2022 qualifiers]. That’s 29 games.

It’s very difficult in qualifying in South America. We have scored 13 more goals than Argentina in 17 games. We are back in first place in the FIFA rankings. We were champions [2019] Copa America. A second place too [in 2021]. We did not win last time, but there was a whole process, in addition to a difficult, troubled moment, full of a series of problems, which I do not want to go into [Brazil took over hosting rights from Colombia and Argentina amid the pandemic but were criticised for doing so while tens of thousands were dying in the country]. We kept a clean sheet in 13 of 17 qualifiers; our average goals scored per game was over 2.5. I would also like to underline one thing: no one wanted to play the Copa América and everyone said so at the [then] President [of Brazil’s football federation, Rogério Caboclo].

Brazil celebrate after winning the Copa América in 2019. Photography: Chris Brunskill/Fantasista/Getty Images

Are Brazil the most envied team? I will tell you a story. An Italian coach mocked Miranda [the Brazil defender, then at Internazionale, after Brazil were knocked out of the 2018 World Cup by Belgium]: “How does it feel to be eliminated by Belgium?” I heard this from Miranda and told Miranda that he [the Italian coach] will never know that feeling because he never coached a nation like Brazil or even his own nation. It’s envy. That’s why he asked her. Many people are jealous of Brazil. They don’t admit it. This is perhaps the most envied team in the world.

It’s a matter of disrespect and envy. This is the legacy that I carry, the legacy that we carry, the story of having Pelé, Zagallo, Tostão, Garrincha. If Zagallo is criticized, how can I not be? Are Brazil the most envied? I think so, but when I go out everyone asks me how I cope with the pressure of coaching the Brazil team.

Recently, Neymar said he was tired and this World Cup could be his last. Are you worried about Neymar? Did you talk about it with him? You said “recently”. We have to be careful when it happened [the interview was released last October but had been recorded months earlier, either soon after PSG had lost a Champions League semi-final or Brazil had lost the Copa final]. If I had spoken right after a cup elimination, I would have also been extremely upset. It needs to be contextualized. We talk to all the players, including Neymar, about the physical, technical, tactical and mental preparation for decisive matches. We transmit ideas. Due to Neymar’s greatness, there will always be high expectations. But now it’s diluted. It’s Neymar, but also Vinícius, Raphinha; Thiago [Silva] is again at the highest level, Paquetá, Casemiro, Fabinho too.

Neymar hugs Vinícius Júnior after scoring against Chile in March's World Cup qualifiers.
Neymar hugs Vinícius Júnior after scoring against Chile in March’s World Cup qualifiers. Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images

Is Neymar your best player or is it Vinícius time? Neymar is Neymar. He remains our biggest star. The difference now is that the glow is diluted by nearby stars which may also glow. The greatness of Neymar is that he understands this – about the growth of these children. He encourages the boys to go up a level. Time and experience give this maturity.

What would it be like to play a World Cup without your mother? She died in 2019 My mother’s naivety…it was beautiful. When we won the Copa America, she asked me if it was bigger than the World Cup. Honey… So I explained it’s not the same cup but it’s hard too. I am at peace. It is also their will what I do. [Tite gets teary-eyed.] I do my father’s will. He was my first coach. I know I make them proud. My mother always gave me a lot of faith, my father the love of sport. I’m fine, I have their light, their energy.

I can only play football for 15 minutes with my grandchildren. I can’t do more because they are very intense. Then their grandmother will play with them a bit. I can’t turn away from football. It is my pleasure, my satisfaction.

I have a lot of videos and games to watch but there are also family moments. I love being with Rosi, walking with her. I like books, chimarrão [maté], coffee, being with my children and grandchildren. I like movies. I read a lot – it strengthens me. But I don’t go out; I always ask to write something.

Tite next to a tactical board.
Tite plans to spend a year with his family and study after the World Cup. Photography: The Guardian

Will this World Cup shape your future? Sure. If you win the World Cup, you get an open market. You can choose. I’m not going to lie: my idea is definitely not to work in Brazil. I want to spend a year with my family, take a gap year, study, have no responsibility because the responsibility is too great. If something comes from outside, it will happen. Now I have the responsibility and the joy of being the coach of the Seleção. I won’t even talk to anyone.

But in the past, have you had offers to take over a European club? Yes, Real Madrid and Sporting. What I like is that when a European club is interested in a professional, they have a conversation to explain to him what he needs. It’s really cool. There was another club that wanted to talk to me and I said no: PSG [after Unai Emery left in May 2018]. They wanted to talk to me and I said I wouldn’t; I don’t want and I don’t want. I don’t want to open up that possibility of anything else. I want to be focused on my work. Then it’s another story.

At the world cup [just before the 2018 tournament]they or they [Madrid] said they wanted to talk and I said no, I won’t talk, don’t come near. I want to be at peace with myself and my work. I give the best of myself. When you do something in parallel, it’s not doing it to the fullest. I can not do it. I received offers from Real Madrid, PSG and Sporting. But I didn’t want that. I want to win the World Cup. After the World Cup, I will decide my future.

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The week in classic: La bohème; Madame Butterfly; Mr Brouček’s Excursions – the review | Opera https://classicitaliancycles.com/the-week-in-classic-la-boheme-madame-butterfly-mr-brouceks-excursions-the-review-opera/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/the-week-in-classic-la-boheme-madame-butterfly-mr-brouceks-excursions-the-review-opera/ OThe mystery of opera production, contrary to the laws of arithmetic, is that addition can turn into subtraction. The New Glyndebourne Festival Bohemian (1896) is full of ideas but they diminish an already whole work by itself. Staged by director Floris Visser, coming on the wings of promise from the Dutch National Opera and beyond, […]]]>

OThe mystery of opera production, contrary to the laws of arithmetic, is that addition can turn into subtraction. The New Glyndebourne Festival Bohemian (1896) is full of ideas but they diminish an already whole work by itself. Staged by director Floris Visser, coming on the wings of promise from the Dutch National Opera and beyond, this is Glyndebourne’s first short story Bohemia for more than two decades. Visser bypasses Puccini’s detailed stage directions and no one should object. A new approach is welcome if it convinces. Thus, the familiar garret, the Latin Quarter and the city gate are replaced by a fixed, high-walled cobbled street that recedes towards a black horizon. Your imagination does the rest.

This oppressive linear space restricts the action, however, and results in a confused relationship between key characters that never finds clarity. The only interruption to the countless shades of gray (designs by Dieuweke van Reij and his team, with effective lighting by Alex Brok) is an accompanying color: sinister red balloons, Mimì’s pink beret and a wreath of flowers sumptuous roses that miraculously sprout from a pile of chairs. Are these the fake flowers that seamstress Mimì makes with fabric? An ubiquitous figure in a long overcoat, yes Death himself (Christopher Lemmings), pulls a tarp aside to reveal those flowers and you know that’s a bad sign, if not a great symbol. If Puccini had needed Death in the cast list, surely he would have created the character. Instead, he managed, quite brilliantly, with a musical play of optimism and angst, to smudge it gradually in every note, bar, change of harmony or flicker of counterpoint, of the score.

The joyous musical and physical interweaving of street vendors, shoppers, children in Act 2’s Momus Cafe Christmas Eve scene, was heartily sung but its usual exuberance was absent. The singing was of a high standard, with a charming Rodolfo in Sehoon Moon (replacing Long Long, delayed by visa delays but arriving shortly). His voice is pure and lyrical, his stage manners childish and sympathetic. As Mimì, Yaritza Véliz, a former Royal Opera House young artist Jette Parker, sang forcefully and above all safely, but the production did little to illuminate her fragile characterization. Daniel Scofield as Vuvu Mpofu’s bubbly Marcello and Musetta made an impression. Richard Suart, with the best Italian of the evening, gave meaning to Benoît’s very small part. The London Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Jordan de Souza, was as always reliable but sounded slightly subdued. For the record, an enthusiastic audience on the first night applauded. Apprehensions yes, but Bohemiawith many performances to come at Glyndebourne, always worth the trip.

Hear Puccini Lady Butterfly (1904), in a revival at the Royal Opera House a few nights later, recalls the distance traveled by the composer between these two popular masterpieces. Dan Ettinger conducted, with the ROH Orchestra and an alert cast, an explosive form (best brass and percussion work). Freddie De Tommaso, tenor of the moment, brought unusual emotion to the selfish Pinkerton. Ashamed and appalled Lucas Meacham as Sharpless and Patricia Bardon as Cassandra-style maid Suzuki excelled. Lianna Haroutounian, in the title role, devastated in her ever more abandoned but skilful, broken but fearless performance.

The interest here, in Moshe Leiser and Patrice Caurier’s 2002 production, is the announced attempt to approach the presentation of the work of Japan. Given the calls in some quarters for the work to be canceled, and at the same time its enormous box office value, ROH had no choice but to call in the experts. Revival director Daniel Dooner worked with a Japanese motion director (Sonoko Kamimura) and many gesture, makeup, and costume adjustments were made. From the back of the stalls, these changes were really subtle. If it gives new credibility to opera, and contributes to the fight against racial stereotypes, we can only applaud. No opera can make a country or its history “authentic”. The real truth in this work – portrayed all too clearly and shockingly by Puccini – is the behavior of a ruthless, imperialistic man towards a vulnerable 15-year-old girl from another culture. Each encounter with this work is a reminder of his genius.

Peter Hoare as Brouček and Fflur Wyn as Malinka in The Excursions of Mr. Brouček. Photography: Marc Brenner

If you have a strong grip on the Hussite rebellion against the Holy Roman Empire – no modesty please – Janáček’s fifth opera may be crystal clear. The slumped among us struggle. The complete title of the work indicates its stakes: M. Brouček’s Excursions to the Moon and to the 15th Century (1920). The text was concocted by seven librettists, based on two Czech short stories. This multiplicity is torn through the opera. Grange Park Opera opened its 2022 season with Broucek in surely the most bizarre, extravagant and insane production of any opera since the Battle of Lipany (Don’t you remember? 1434).

David Pountney, as a director and translator, knows this repertoire (he directed the entire Janáček cycle). Essentially, Brouček is a dissatisfied Philistine landlord whose desires center around beer and sausages. In a drunken state, he finds himself first on the moon, then in the 15th century. The scenes change rapidly, from the lunar landscape to the Hussite past (cartooning by Leslie Travers and Marie-Jeanne Lecca; lighting by Tim Mitchell). The joke, peppered with contemporary references to Boris, goes on too long, but Janáček’s music is irresistible. The BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by George Jackson, performed with robust flair. A deluxe British cast, led by an incomparable Peter Hoare, shed light on Janáček’s grueling vocal lines and included Fflur Wynne, Mark Le Brocq, Andrew Shore, Clive Bayley, Anne-Marie Owens and Adrian Thompson. The only way to approach this quirk is to shed the bondage of logic or sense and embrace your inner zen. Breathe deeply. So everything makes sense.

Star ratings (out of five)
Bohemian ★★★
Mrs. Butterfly ★★★★
Mr Broucek’s Excursions ★★★★

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Neighborhood groups bring groups back to donate free household items, furniture, clothes in an effort to reduce waste https://classicitaliancycles.com/neighborhood-groups-bring-groups-back-to-donate-free-household-items-furniture-clothes-in-an-effort-to-reduce-waste/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 01:30:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/neighborhood-groups-bring-groups-back-to-donate-free-household-items-furniture-clothes-in-an-effort-to-reduce-waste/ Bella, Leonardo Urbano’s kitten, was rescued from a pile of trash that would otherwise have ended up in landfill. Using tips from Facebook pages such as Street Bounty, Urbano found nearly every object in the photo below on the street, including his mischievous cat. These include the brand new shirt he is wearing, his chair, […]]]>

Bella, Leonardo Urbano’s kitten, was rescued from a pile of trash that would otherwise have ended up in landfill. Using tips from Facebook pages such as Street Bounty, Urbano found nearly every object in the photo below on the street, including his mischievous cat.

These include the brand new shirt he is wearing, his chair, the framed photo, the fan, the mid-century sideboard and record player, the plant and the replica of an Italian lamp that usually sells for almost $1000.

Leo Urbano, also known as Trash Lawyer on Instagram, with his cat and some used items he collected. Credit:Dominique Lorrimer

Facebook pages – such as Street Bounty Inner West, Pay It Forward, Buy Nothing, War on Waste, Free Stuff and Free Cycle, which are dedicated to recycling and reuse – have become “gangbusters” during the pandemic, said Sam Sachdev, who has been tracking the growth of these hyperlocal sites.

“There are hundreds of these sites. Almost every Sydney suburb has a buy, sell or share group. On top of that, they will have a free cycle, which is just sharing and no money exchange. Then there are groups for the North Rim or The Hills. And then there’s Street Bounty. There are layers upon layers. Everything is very organic and popular.

“The neighborhood concept was gone before the pandemic, and these groups brought it back,” said Sachdev, a former corporate lawyer who is also a business writer and climate change and sustainability activist during her time. free.

“You have some unusual people – like the person who gives an open packet of cereal, but after all, why waste it?”

Urbano usually draws the line at food, but he rescued cans nearly full of good olive oil thrown away after apartment leases near his Surry Hills home ran out In Sydney.

Urbano said he chose his Instagram account, the Trash Lawyer, because he “fights for trash’s right to live another day” — no matter how. He also has a lending library of tools he found on the street that people can borrow to repair found items.

A Facebook spokesperson said there was a 13% increase in home furniture listings in 2021 compared to the first year of the pandemic. In June, more than 2 million vintage items were listed on Marketplace, including collectibles, furniture, and homewares.

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New AM Enriques Agnoletti High School of Sesto Fiorentino / Settanta7 https://classicitaliancycles.com/new-am-enriques-agnoletti-high-school-of-sesto-fiorentino-settanta7/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://classicitaliancycles.com/new-am-enriques-agnoletti-high-school-of-sesto-fiorentino-settanta7/ New AM Enriques Agnoletti High School of Sesto Fiorentino / Settanta7 © Marco Cappelletti + 47 To share To share Facebook Twitter Mail pinterest WhatsApp Or https://www.archdaily.com/983525/new-am-enriques-agnoletti-high-school-of-sesto-fiorentino-settanta7 © Marco Cappelletti “A contemporary school must be a privileged place for the transmission of knowledge, a civic center and a point of reference for the community”. A […]]]>

New AM Enriques Agnoletti High School of Sesto Fiorentino / Settanta7

New High School AM Enriques Agnoletti of Sesto Fiorentino / Settanta7 - Outdoor photography, Urban landscapeNew AM Enriques Agnoletti High School of Sesto Fiorentino / Settanta7 - Exterior Photography, Facade, WindowsNew AM Enriques Agnoletti High School of Sesto Fiorentino / Settanta7 - Exterior Photography, Facade, WindowsNew AM Enriques Agnoletti High School of Sesto Fiorentino / Settanta7 - Interior photography, Stairs+ 47